Author

About the Author
Keith is the Author of The Political Optimist and you can follow him at genuineoptimist.com. He is a visionary founder of Local Common Wealth (see localcommonwealth.org) and co-founder of Vision Impact Leadership. He is a licensed general contractor at kelschconstruction.com and part time faculty member at Dixie State University.

Fighting Discouragement and Scarcity, Episode 9

The problem is universal for most, at least for genuine optimists.

We have no teeth in the game of giving
We have no voice
We have no means of building consensus
We therefor care less about our communities
And more waste continues to be the name of the game

If you have ever felt at a complete loss and have wanted to give up your pursuit for doing something good, there is a solution.

 

In this episode I talk about more teeth, and real ownership.

How to care without waste
More conservation
More voice
More good

The movement of privately organize bodies of free association is coming. This episode explains why.

 

Losing Mass, Episode 8

In our world today, we do everything in mass. We have mass schooling, which leads to mass shootings. We have mass media, which creates mass manipulation. We have mass marketing, which leads to mass consumerism. Living in mass is opposite of a single person.

Living in mass has consequences. It is like living in war against individualism. Either join the mass, or stand-alone.

I do not think people want to stand alone, but I also think they do not want to live in mass anymore. They want connection, they want community, they want family and friendship. They want a company culture that is thriving and not a culture that is authoritarian. Human beings do not function well in mass. Some think we do, and they are the problem.

Throughout human history, certain elitist powers have pushed for more mass control. Well, I am here to tell you that is going to end.

A renaissance is coming. We are finally waking up to the elephant in the room; we see the controls that have been kept over our lives for a very long time. Here is what more of us are starting to see.

  1. Power struggles, they are unnecessary.
  2. Globalism, it’s a fake ideal.
  3. Multi-national corporations, they are meddlers and schemers.
  4. Apathy, it’s killing us.

What are the two solutions to these problems?

  1. The conservation of voice, the purity of democracy must be born.
  2. The conservation of responsibility, classical liberalism must return.

The modern leftist mind, and many on the right, have been pushing for big global solutions designed by corporate overlords and not by the people. They make their agendas sound pretty, but hidden is their oppressive intent of elitist minds that are losing mass control. If we think that we can fight this power establishment directly, we are mistaken. We cannot replace a corrupt power over the masses with another power over the masses. Lord Akin was correct when he said, “Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely.” For this reason we need to start looking at power in a new way. We need to see all the visionary ways we can decentralize it.

The first step is the conservation of voice. Letting people talk and allowing for vision to rise naturally from the people, and in modular form and with no single representative serving the masses, this will be central to launching a renaissance. I will explain what I mean by modular form in podcasts to come. Just think of a republic but on a more local scale.

The second step is implementing a near strict conservation of responsibility as locally as possible. When we give away responsibility, we become more apathetic as a people. We care less and we have no culture. We have allowed planned parenthood to care more than we care, thus we give up our responsibility to serve to an outside agency. We have allowed college accrediting agencies dictate everything we teach and without our consent. We have allowed our lands to be managed at a greater distance by controlling interests with more money. Just about everything these days is about mass, controlling us as a mass, dictating to as a mass, and manipulating us as a mass.

Well, those days are over. We are far more diverse, far more creative, and we have greater vision than any mass could ever create. A renaissance is coming, and this voice is a brother to your heart and a friend to your hope.

What Causes a Renaissance?

An awakening begins when 1 – 3% of the population wakes up. This is when a small percentage begins to realize the generations of darkness that have been maintained by heavy-handed control. Typically, this darkness has no limits to its deception and corruption.

As the people begin to awaken, the outward repression of ideas by the power controllers is made public at the same time, obviously as an attempt to shut down this awakening. In other words, the cockroaches are revealed as an overwhelming scourge with just a flicker of a match.

As with all serious problems, once they are realized, even with the smallest of light, new ideas find a way out of the darkness, specifically new ideas across the board in health, education, science, technology and more. Ideas should surface naturally, with no power struggle.

For too long we have focused on technology as the vehicle for advancing humanity. The idea suppressed the most is associated with better ways of human organization. In other words, how we come together, reach agreement, and move forward is going to be the source of our renaissance.

GMOs and Growth hormone in milk are a good example of a small enough percent waking up to bad ideas.

As we move from 1.5% to 3% and beyond, this small group begins to fight the establishment by revealing their corruption.

3% spreads the word of liberty against the backdrop of massive corruption. A populous movement begins to surface. A populous movement happens when close to 13% of the population is fully awoken and speaking up.

We then reach a fork in the road. This is where we are now.

We either take over the power structure with a new populist movement, which often has a new technology that decentralizes communication. Today we are lacking a technology that decentralizes communication; consequently a massive censorship campaign is tacking place against all voices trying to move the cause of liberty.

Or, the second fork is taken. Here we find a new way to organize under the power of free association, essentially a new founding of liberty is launched. This second fork is the preferred option for several reasons.

As I discussed in a previous post about the power of free association, when we organize ourselves in a decentralized manner, this is what we call moving the cause of liberty. Every renaissance or awakening happens in this way. We find a way to come together with less centralized control.

Let’s say enough people go in both directions, meaning both forks are taken. All we would need is at least 3% of the population to take one fork and another 3% to take the other fork. This is a true a renaissance. It is not a full renaissance until you reach at least 13% of the population. A renaissance is considered mainstream at this point.

I want to talk about this second force, the new founding.

If you are awake and if you have taken the red pill, you probably see what many have started to see, namely that the world is filled with political power struggles just about everywhere. From local governments, state offices to federal bureaucracies, the centralization of power has been an ongoing problem for the past one-hundred years.

Optimism is all about seeing a better world to come, and if a good idea needs your help to advance it, then be an evangelist for that idea.

The Power of Free Association, Episode 6

Something happened in American society. We lost our gumption for free association.

Free association is a combined expression of liberty that we all share together. Free association is how we organize outside of established means, such as local, state and federal governments. Free association is also something we can do outside of religion and outside of corporations. The First Amendment defines this power as the right “to peaceably assemble.”

Too often we think this means to protest on the streets or to have an occupy movement. These are sometimes not very peaceful, but they are founded on the right to peaceably assemble.

Sometimes we do not understand how powerful this right is or how to use it. First, we should ask why we have this right in The United States and why most countries do not? Prior to the Declaration of Independence, we were subject to the King who lived thousands of miles away. How would that distance influence your thinking? I can only imagine thinking something like the following: “A king, thousands of miles away, across an ocean, what do we need him for?” “What good is he?” “All he does is tax us to death.”

The farther you try to control something from a distance, the more elitist you become and the more the people begin to peaceably assemble and organize. That is what happened in The United States.

It never worked that way in many other countries because there was less of a distance between the ruling monarchy and the people. In those countries, if you dared to assemble outside the state or church, you would be throne in jail. That is still the case in many countries today, especially in China, parts of the Middle East and recently in Russia. Throughout human history, people have been forced to assemble in private. Even when tribes in Scotland conducted local conventicles, the Coventicle Act of 1664 was passed by Parliament that forbade conventicles, which were religious assemblies of more than five people that were not members of an immediate family, but outside the control of the Church of England. The oppression was so great against peacefully assembly, that people met privately out in the fields.

When we peaceably assemble, it’s a direct threat to established powers. They don’t want people to organize. They do not want people talking with each other. The right to organize and to peaceably assemble is a freedom we hold together, and we have lost touch with this freedom, mainly because we do not know its true power.

When our elected representatives fail us, or when organizations and governments become increasingly political, we start to look at organizing in a fresh way. Sometimes it takes a lot of stress or a major crisis to get us to work together, and when that crisis does come, because we have the right to peaceably assembly, we organize. This is the one true quality that makes us Americans. We start asking why are things the way they are and why not re-organize to recapture what was lost. Why not conserve what is still good. Why not imagine what could be? Americans ask these questions because we have the right to assemble and ask them.

We are fast approaching a tipping point and people are looking for better ways to organize. Most are just scratching their heads for now. That’s ok, just keep listening to the show.

Let me explain what is going through my mind. I live in a culture with a dominant religion. I am active in this religion. I mention this because religious organizations suffer from the same thing that all organizations suffer from; they suffer from power struggles. When you centralize too much control and too much wealth at a great distance from the people, this is what you get, a lot of power struggles. This gets in the way of free association.

A power struggle is the pretended support of a superior or power center for personal gain while ignoring the voice of those below. You will not find this definition of “political” in any dictionary, but you will find associated words like shrewd and crafty. The question is why?

Why do we need to be shrewd and crafty? Why do we teach leaders certain qualities of detachment as apposed to the qualities of being genuine? Why does distance seem to continually grow between the people and their leaders?

When you study the word politic or political, it is not a positive word. Derived from “polity,” which means civil government, the actual workings of government are never explained. It’s like being told that gravity exists but never getting an explanation of the real mechanics of how it works. For example, try to explain how gravity works to a modern physicist and you will have a hard time getting them to listen. I have seen this happen in front of my eyes. A theoretical physicist in my town spent most of his life creating a unified field theory in physics. He used a very remarkable epistemology, which is a very disciplined way of knowing. Someday I need to do a podcast of epistemology, it happens to be the most powerful field in all of philosophy. Anyway, this gentleman can explain in simple terms what gravity is, which he calls the graduating magnetic field, and how it works, even its affect on light. However, without a PhD or any exclusive background, he has been sidelined throughout his life. This kind of suppression of new vision eventually causes people to organize.

I tell this story because knowing the mechanics of how things work is the purest form of knowledge. And knowing how politics actually works is the key to seeing how organizations die and why the right of free association eventually rises to challenge established power centers with new vision. And that’s why we peaceably assemble, to communicate new vision.

I created an image that communicates this. I call it the Culture Cycle.

Imagine a circle…

In order to bypass power struggles, apathy, selfishness and scarcity which all lead the collapse of organizations and cultures, we need to jump directly to vision. The minute we reach success and abundance, we need to get back to vision. This means the open and peaceful assembly needs to be part of any organization. It also means it needs to be headless. I will talk about this in an upcoming show.

I just want to reinforce that vision regenerates organizations and creates thriving cultures. When vision is sidelined, suppressed and shut down, we can almost guarantee that elitism has taken hold. This is what many are feeling around the world; elitism has built up over many years.

A renaissance is coming, and it will surface in our right to peaceably assemble to launch new organizations, new businesses managed by the people, new enterprises that compete with heavy handed authoritarianism, and so much more, and all because they have a combined voice to lift these visions above the constraints imposed by controllers at a distance.

Free association is going to come back in a big way. This is how every renaissance is born, not from individuals doing great things, but from entire cultures choosing to thrive. It may start with a few visionaries, but it quickly spreads and fills the earth as waters cover the seas.

If you can see this vision, you have a friend who knows your heart. If you cannot see it, hold tight and keep following the Genuine Optimist.

What is a Political Optimist? Episode 5

A political optimist is a person wearing the false clothing of optimism. Yes, this is an oxymoron, two words combined that create a contradiction. Political means false; optimism means best. Political optimism is the false best. Specifically, it is a person who politicizes optimism.

We never really used the word politicize years ago. We used partisan. We shifted to political because political takes the side of power. Partisan takes the side of party. The shift to political accommodates more conniving and cunning that dominates society today. By the way, I take the side of people and I reject power and party as a genuine focus.

Anyway, political optimists are controlling people from a distance. That’s the key. They do everything from a distance. They impose confidence from an elitist distance and they manage from a distance. They are like outside consultants telling you how to handle an inside crisis. They look and sound close, but in truth, their heart is far from you.

Have you every chased a rainbow? With every step you take to get closer to the rainbow, it moves away. This is a political optimist. They glimmer but you can never get close enough feel any warmth.

Political optimists are charlatans. They politicize the spirit of optimism, which is to say they do not promote the optimum or best of anything; they promote only what sounds good. They charge the air with their capital success without any attempt to understand your concerned mind. In a way, greater success separates the political person from the responsibility of genuine optimism.

Let me tell you what is on my mind. I know this person in my community. He is always full of smiles and pats everyone on the back. He is wealthy and well known in the community. He makes small talk and moves away rather quickly just to make sure nothing serious surfaces. He has served in many community leadership positions; many call him “a good man.” “Oh, that’s Joe,” people say, “he’s a good man.” We call nice guys good men these days. I call them political optimists. Here’s why.

So-called “good men” can take the word optimism and turn it into an attitude of constant and temporary upbeat-ness. They always stay in the shallows. They never really get to know anyone for who they are. They steer clear of real connections. They never swim in the deep. There are better men and women than this, so why call a person “a good man” when that person stays clear of real relationships?

Modern motivational self-help is to blame, in part, but mostly it’s the hierarchy structures we put over us. We emphasize political distance from any open dissent. I call it the mote and the castle.

(Listen to podcast to find out what this is)

Kingdom builders handle disagreement with disdain, as if all dissent is negativism. They even say that a politically correct language improves the workplace, the community, and the family. This is not true. The silencing of discussion, all because someone is trigger, is politicalized optimism; it is the assumption of infallibility in the language. Forced correctness feeds on the worship of authority at the cost of losing agency.

I use the reference of my anonymous Joe because political people use the distance of their success to magically detach themselves from the burdens and disagreements others carry. This is opposite the leader who carries those burdens and openly stands to be questioned. At every turn, political optimists produce top-down, centrally controlled organizations with no access to rise against their authority. This model places leadership at a greater distance from a genuine optimism of dissent. It also explains why people like Joe avoid showing any responsibility toward new ideas, especially challenging ideas. New ideas require him to be more responsible in listening and acting on those ideas. It is best to create a mote around one’s castle to get protection from new ideas entering.

Even though Joe is retired, he is always in a hurry to nowhere. I believe he is in the hurry to get clear of taking any responsible care for another.

For me, I prefer the safeguards of “being genuine” as a counter measure to “being political.” Being genuine teaches how we must stand to be corrected while still questioning authority. I have tried to talk to Joe about this, but he always smiles and walks away to give a temporary moment to the next person in line.

Have you seen a pack rat? This is a person who piles up stuff that they never use or properly dispose of. It is like a political pack rat, which is a person who piles up supposedly important connections purely to advance their own status.

Compare a pack rat to a packhorse. A packhorse carries the load whereas a pack rat hoards the load. Most people are either a political pack rat, or they are a packhorse. Pack rats are political. Packhorses are not.

Political pack rats collect power and position but they never use or properly dispose of power. They give everyone a temporary moment but never a lasting connection. Everything is a transaction, never a relationship. In other words, packrats never give power to those below or to the side. Because their focus is directed toward a power source above them, and often at a distance, they are hard to read. They never carry the load like a packhorse.

Therefore, if you want to learn how to read political people and attract more packhorses into your organization, stop hiring people you can manage and hire people who take responsibility. Stop trying to build relationships with political people. It’s futile.

As in all things rebellious, some undressing will need to take place. We need a bit of bravery within each of us to say openly, “The optimist has no clothes.”

To those afraid of speaking, we often say, “imagine the audience is naked.” Why not say, “Imagine the speaker is naked.” Why not say, “imagine the political person is naked?”

It is just as helpful to see those in leadership undressed and naked, as it is to see the audience naked. It may be the only way to stop the destructive worship of authority over our own minds.

Learning to read political people requires that we see them naked in the community when most remain captivated by their show. When we undress the political person, we quickly see staged acts, underhanded intimidation, and irrational energy. All three attract political pack rats in great numbers.

I wrote a book about this. It is called The Political Optimist. Political Optimists can destroy entire nations and collapse a thriving corporation. If there is one thing alone that will save your business or make for a better society, learning to read political people is that one thing. The second is learning how to deal with them.

When we undress the political person using a fake optimism to cover a shallow connection with the community, we see the same underlying problem that every human confronts, namely a lot of repressed fear.

Have you ever subjected yourself to the cult of one person’s personality? It’s like your entire free agency is suddenly gone. You can’t speak up, ask questions, or offer new ideas. These people demand complete allegiance. If you give off the impression that you cannot be managed or controlled, you will be removed. If you give off the idea that you have ideas, you will not be hired by political people.

In the book, I describe three different kinds of political people, staged personalities, intimidators and irrational minds. They all use a politicized optimism to maintain power and control.

Read the book. It’s available on Amazon and Lulu, and soon to come to Kindle and an audio version.

Just remember, a political optimist is a person wearing the false clothing of optimism. Political means false; optimism means best. Political optimism is the false best. Specifically, it is a person who politicizes optimism.

We do not need these people. We need genuine optimists, people driven to create thriving cultures and open discourse. These are people who demand common consent and they fight against central control. They love discussion and never seek to shut it down. They are purple people, never the extreme, just the silent majority. A renaissance is coming and they are learning how to organize their passion for consent. Get ready, they are rising in voice and vision, and the world will change forever.